Main BibliographyПо названиям
 
 Bibliography
Volcano:

 
Jump to:     All     "     0     1     2     3     4     7     A     B     C     D     E     F     G     H     I     K     L     M     N     O     P     Q     R     S     T     U     V     W          А     Б     В     Г     Д     Е     Ж     З     И     К     Л     М     Н     О     П     Р     С     Т     У     Ф     Х     Ц     Ч     Ш     Э     Ю     Я     
Records: 2235
Pages:  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224
 H
Holocene eruptive history of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia (2007)
Ponomareva V., Kyle P., Pevzner M., Sulerzhitsky L., Hartman M. Holocene eruptive history of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia // Geophysical Monograph Series. // Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region. 2007. V. 172. P. 263-282. № doi:10.1029/172GM19.    Annotation
The Holocene eruptive history of Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, has been reconstructed using geologic mapping, tephrochronology, radiocarbon dating, XRF and microprobe analyses. Eruptions of Shiveluch during the Holocene have occurred with irregular repose times alternating between periods of explosive activity and dome growth. The most intense volcanism, with frequent large and moderate eruptions occurred around 6500–6400 BC, 2250–2000 BC, and 50–650 AD, coincides with the all-Kamchatka peaks of volcanic activity. The current active period started around 900 BC; since then the large and moderate eruptions has been following each other in 50–400 yrs-long intervals. This persistent strong activity can be matched only by the early Holocene one.
Most Shiveluch eruptions during the Holocene produced medium-K, hornblendebearing andesitic material characterized by high MgO (2.3–6.8 wt %), Cr (47–520 ppm), Ni (18–106 ppm) and Sr (471–615 ppm), and low Y (> 18 ppm). Only two mafic tephras erupted about 6500 and 2000 BC, each within the period of most intense activity.
Many past eruptions from Shiveluch were larger and far more hazardous then the historical ones. The largest Holocene eruption occurred ∼1050 AD and yielded >2.5 km3 of tephra. More than 10 debris avalanches took place only in the second half of the Holocene. Extent of Shiveluch tephra falls exceeded 350 km; travel distance of pyroclastic density currents was > 22 km, and that of the debris avalanches ≤20 km.
Holocene tephra from the Chukchi-Alaskan margin, Arctic Ocean: Implications for sediment chronostratigraphy and volcanic history (2017)
Ponomareva Vera, Polyak Leonid, Portnyagin Maxim, Abbott Peter, Zelenin Egor, Vakhrameeva Polina, Garbe-Schönberg Dieter Holocene tephra from the Chukchi-Alaskan margin, Arctic Ocean: Implications for sediment chronostratigraphy and volcanic history // Quaternary Geochronology. 2017. doi:10.1016/j.quageo.2017.11.001.    Annotation
Developing chronologies for sediments in the Arctic Ocean and its continental margins is an important but challenging task. Tephrochronology is a promising tool for independent age control for Arctic marine sediments and here we present the results of a cryptotephra study of a Holocene sedimentary record from the Chukchi Sea. Volcanic glass shards were identified and quantified in sediment core HLY0501-01 and geochemically characterized with single-shard electron microprobe and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This enabled us to reveal a continuous presence of glass shards with identifiable chemical compositions throughout the core. The major input of glasses into the sediments is geochemically fingerprinted to the ∼3.6 ka Aniakchak caldera II eruption (Alaska), which provides an important chronostratigraphic constraint for Holocene marine deposits in the Chukchi-Alaskan region and, potentially, farther away in the western Arctic Ocean. New findings of the Aniakchak II tephra permit a reevaluation of the eruption size and highlight the importance of this tephra as a hemispheric late Holocene marker. Other identified glasses likely originate from the late Pleistocene Dawson and Old Crow tephras while some cannot be correlated to certain eruptions. These are present in most of the analyzed samples, and form a continuous low-concentration background throughout the investigated record. A large proportion of these glasses are likely to have been reworked and brought to the depositional site by currents or other transportation agents, such as sea ice. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential for tephrochronology for improving and developing chronologies for Arctic Ocean marine records, however, at some sites reworking and redistribution of tephra may have a strong impact on the record of primary tephra deposition.
Holocene volcanism of Northern Kamchatka: The spatiotemporal aspect (2006)
Pevzner M.M. Holocene volcanism of Northern Kamchatka: The spatiotemporal aspect // Doklady Earth Sciences. 2006. Т. 409. № 2. С. 884-887. doi: 10.1134/S1028334X06060109.
How a tectonic earthquake may wake up volcanoes: Stress transfer during the 1996 earthquake–eruption sequence at the Karymsky Volcanic Group, Kamchatka (2007)
Walter Thomas R. How a tectonic earthquake may wake up volcanoes: Stress transfer during the 1996 earthquake–eruption sequence at the Karymsky Volcanic Group, Kamchatka // Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2007. V. 264. № 3–4. P. 347 - 359. doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2007.09.006.    Annotation
A large tectonic earthquake occurred on Kamchatka peninsular on New Year's Day of 1996 along a SW–NE trending fracture system. Just two days after the earthquake and at a distance of about 10–20 km to the north, a simultaneous eruption of two separate volcanoes followed. These were Karymsky Volcano and Akademia Nauk Volcano, the latter having its first eruption in historical records. In this paper I use numerical models in order to elaborate the static stress transfer between the earthquake and the volcanic system during the sequence that culminated in the January 1996 volcano-tectonic events. The models were designed to consider (i) the geodetically identified pre-eruptive period of doming in order to calculate stress changes at the nearby SW–NE trending fracture zone, and (ii) the January 1996 Mw 7.1 earthquake in order to calculate the dilatation and stress changes at the magma plumbing system. The results suggest that stress changes related to year-long inflation under the volcanic centers increased the Coulomb failure stress at the active faults and thus encouraged the earthquake. The earthquake, in turn, prompted dilatation at the magmatic system together with extensional normal stress at intruding N–S trending dikes. Also, field measurements confirmed the presence of N–S oriented fractures above the dike. Unclamping of the N–S oriented fractures allowed magma to propagate and eventually to trigger the twin-eruption at the volcanoes Karymsky and Akademia Nauk. These findings imply that successful hazard evaluations at volcanoes elsewhere require consideration of the seismo-tectonic framework and large earthquake cycles.
Hydrated sub-arc mantle: a source for the Kluchevskoy volcano, Kamchatka/Russia (2000)
Dorendorf Frank, Wiechert Uwe, Wörner Gerhard Hydrated sub-arc mantle: a source for the Kluchevskoy volcano, Kamchatka/Russia // Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2000. V. 175. № 1–2. P. 69 - 86. doi: 10.1016/S0012-821X(99)00288-5.    Annotation
Oxygen isotope ratios of olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts from the Kluchevskoy volcano in Kamchatka have been studied by CO2 and ArF laser techniques. Measured δ18O values of 5.8–7.1‰ for olivine and 6.2–7.5‰ for clinopyroxene are significantly heavier than typical mantle values and cannot be explained by crustal assimilation or a contribution of oceanic sediments. Positive correlations between δ18O and fluid-mobile elements (Cs, Li, Sr, Rb, Ba, Th, U, LREE, K) and a lack of correlation with fluid-immobile elements (HFSE, HREE) suggest that 18O was introduced into the mantle source by a fluid from subducted altered oceanic basalt. This conclusion is supported by radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb). Mass balance excludes simple fluid-induced mantle melting. Instead, our observations are consistent with melting a mantle wedge which has been hydrated by 18O-rich fluids percolating through the mantle wedge. 18O-enriched fluids are derived from the subducted oceanic crust and the Emperor seamount chain, which is responsible for a particularly high fluid flux. This hydrated mantle wedge was subsequently involved in arc magmatism beneath Kluchevskoy by active intra-arc rifting.
Hydrogen isotope geochemistry and heat balance of a fumarolic system: Kudriavy volcano, Kuriles (2003)
Botcharnikov Roman E., Shmulovich Kirill I., Tkachenko Sergey I., Korzhinsky Mikhail A., Rybin Alexander V. Hydrogen isotope geochemistry and heat balance of a fumarolic system: Kudriavy volcano, Kuriles // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2003. V. 124. № 1-2. P. 45-66. doi:10.1016/S0377-0273(03)00043-X.    Annotation
The temperature and hydrogen isotope composition of the fumarolic gases have been studied at Kudriavy volcano, Kurile Islands, which is unique for investigating the processes of magma degassing because of the occurrence of numerous easily accessible fumaroles with a temperature range of 100–940°C. There are several local fumarolic fields with a total surface area of about 2600 m2 within the flattened crater of 200×600 m. Each fumarolic field is characterized by the occurrence of high- and low-temperature fumaroles with high gas discharges and steaming areas with lower temperatures. We have studied the thermal budget of the Kudriavy fumarolic system on the basis of the quantitative dependences of the hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) and tritium concentration on the temperature of fumarolic gases and compared them with the calculated heat balance of mixing between hot magmatic gas and cold meteoric water. Hydrogen isotope composition (δD and 3H) shows a well expressed correlation with the gas temperature. Since D/H ratio and 3H are good indicators of water sources in volcanic areas, it suggests that the thermal budget of the fumarolic system is mostly controlled by the admixing of meteoric waters to magmatic gases. The convective mechanism of heat transfer in the hydrothermal system governs the maximum temperatures of local fumaroles and fumarolic fields. Low-temperature fumaroles at Kudriavy are thermally buffered by the boiling processes of meteoric waters in the mixing zone at pressures of 3–12 bar. These values may correspond to the hydrostatic pressure of water columns about 30–120 m in height in the volcanic edifice and hence to the depth of a mixing/boiling zone. Conductive heat transfer is governed by conductive heat exchange between gases and country rocks and appears to be responsible for the temperature distribution around a local fumarolic vent. The temperature and pressure of shallow degassing magma are estimated to be 1050°C and 2–3 bar, respectively. The length of the ‘main’ fumarolic gas conduit is estimated to be about 80 m from the linear correlation between maximal temperatures of fumarolic fields and distances to the highest-temperature ‘F-940’ fumarole. This value may correspond to the depth of an apical part of the magmatic chamber. The geometry of the crater zone at the Kudriavy summit and the model of convective gas cooling suggest different hydrostatic pressures in the hydrothermal system at the base of high- and low-temperature gas conduits. The depths of gas sources for low-temperature fumaroles are evaluated to be about 200 m at the periphery of the magma chamber.
 I
IVS FEB RAS Geoportal for integration and increasing availability of volcanological data (2013)
Romanova Iraida M. IVS FEB RAS Geoportal for integration and increasing availability of volcanological data // IAVCEI 2013 Scientific Assembly. July 20 - 24, Kagoshima, Japan. 2013. P. 1279
Identification of Source Lithology at South Segment of Kamchatka Subduction Zone (2012)
Gavrilenko M., Herzberg C., Portnyagin M., Ozerov A. Identification of Source Lithology at South Segment of Kamchatka Subduction Zone // Abstract V31A-2761 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec. 2012.
Identification of a widespread Kamchatkan tephra: A middle Pleistocene tie-point between Arctic and Pacific paleoclimatic records (2013)
Ponomareva Vera, Portnyagin Maxim, Derkachev Alexander, Juschus Olaf, Garbe-Schönberg Dieter, Nürnberg Dirk Identification of a widespread Kamchatkan tephra: A middle Pleistocene tie-point between Arctic and Pacific paleoclimatic records // Geophysical Research Letters. 2013. V. 40. № 14. P. 3538-3543. doi:10.1002/grl.50645.    Annotation
Very few age controls exist for Quaternary deposits over the vast territory of the East Russian Arctic, which hampers dating of major environmental changes in this area and prevents their correlation to climatic changes in the Arctic and Pacific marine domains. We report a newly identified ~177 ka old Rauchua tephra, which has been dispersed over an area of >1,500,000 km2 and directly links terrestrial paleoenvironmental archives from Arctic Siberia with marine cores in the northwest Pacific, thus permitting their synchronization and dating. The Rauchua tephra can help to identify deposits formed in terrestrial and marine environments during the oxygen isotope stage 6.5 warming event. Chemical composition of volcanic glass from the Rauchua tephra points to its island-arc origin, while its spatial distribution singles out the Kamchatka volcanic arc as a source. The Rauchua tephra represents a previously unknown, large (magnitude >6.5) explosive eruption from the Kamchatka volcanic arc.
Improving our understanding of Southeast Asian volcanic eruption histories, with an emphasis on Sumatra (Indonesia) (2018)
Bouvet De Maisonneuve Caroline, Bergal-Kuvikas Olga, Phua Marcus, Bradley Kyle, Oalmann Jeffrey, Eisele Steffen, Forni Francesca, Fairuz Razali Nur, Rizaldi Putra, Rifai Hamdi Improving our understanding of Southeast Asian volcanic eruption histories, with an emphasis on Sumatra (Indonesia) // Crossing New Frontiers - Tephra Hunt in Transylvania 24-29 June 2018 in Romania, Europe. 2018.





 

Recommended browsers for viewing this site: Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, Yandex. Using another browser may cause incorrect browsing of webpages.
 
Terms of use of IVS FEB RAS Geoportal materials and services

Copyright © Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS, 2010-2020. Terms of use.
No part of the Geoportal and/or Geoportal content can be reproduced in any form whether electronically or otherwise without the prior consent of the copyright holder. You must provide a link to the Geoportal geoportal.kscnet.ru from your own website.
 
©Design: roman@kscnet.ru