Mutnovsky Volcano. Bibliography
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Ozerova N.A., Ozerov A.Yu. Mercury in vapor-gas fumarole jets and products of their sedimentation at the Mutnovsky volcano // Commission on the chemistry of volcanic gases (CCVG) - IAVCEI. 11th Gas Workshop, Kamchatka, Russia. 1-10 September 2011. 2011. P. 36
Ponomareva Vera V., Melekestsev Ivan V., Dirksen Oleg V. Sector collapses and large landslides on Late Pleistocene–Holocene volcanoes in Kamchatka, Russia // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2006. V. 158. № 1-2. P. 117-138. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2006.04.016.    Annotation
On Kamchatka, detailed geologic and geomorphologic mapping of young volcanic terrains and observations on historical eruptions reveal that landslides of various scales, from small (0.001 km3) to catastrophic (up to 20–30 km3), are widespread. Moreover, these processes are among the most effective and most rapid geomorphic agents. Of 30 recently active Kamchatka volcanoes, at least 18 have experienced sector collapses, some of them repetitively. The largest sector collapses identified so far on Kamchatka volcanoes, with volumes of 20–30 km3 of resulting debris-avalanche deposits, occurred at Shiveluch and Avachinsky volcanoes in the Late Pleistocene. During the last 10,000 yr the most voluminous sector collapses have occurred on extinct Kamen' (4–6 km3) and active Kambalny (5–10 km3) volcanoes. The largest number of repetitive debris avalanches (> 10 during just the Holocene) has occurred at Shiveluch volcano. Landslides from the volcanoes cut by ring-faults of the large collapse calderas were ubiquitous. Large failures have happened on both mafic and silicic volcanoes, mostly related to volcanic activity. Orientation of collapse craters is controlled by local tectonic stress fields rather than regional fault systems.

Specific features of some debris avalanche deposits are toreva blocks — huge almost intact fragments of volcanic edifices involved in the failure; some have been erroneously mapped as individual volcanoes. One of the largest toreva blocks is Mt. Monastyr' — a ∼ 2 km3 piece of Avachinsky Somma involved in a major sector collapse 30–40 ka BP.

Long-term forecast of sector collapses on Kliuchevskoi, Koriaksky, Young Cone of Avachinsky and some other volcanoes highlights the importance of closer studies of their structure and stability.
Shishkina T.A., Botcharnikov R.E., Holtz F., Almeev R.R., Portnyagin M.V. Solubility of H2O- and CO2-bearing fluids in tholeiitic basalts at pressures up to 500 MPa // Chemical Geology. 2010. V. 277. № 1–2. P. 115 - 125. doi: 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2010.07.014.    Annotation
The solubility of H2O- and CO2-bearing fluids in tholeiitic basalts has been investigated experimentally at temperature of 1250 °C and pressures of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MPa. The concentrations of dissolved H2O and CO2 have been determined using FTIR spectroscopy with an accurate calibration of the absorption coefficients for hydrogen- and carbon-bearing species using synthesized standards of the same tholeiitic composition. The absorption coefficients are 0.65 ± 0.08 and 0.69 ± 0.08 L/(mol cm) for molecular H2O and OH groups by Near-Infrared (NIR), respectively, and 68 ± 10 L/(mol cm) for bulk H2O by Mid-Infrared (MIR). The carbonate groups determined by MIR have an absorption coefficient of 317 ± 23 L/(mol cm) for the band at 1430 cm−1.The solubility of H2O in the melt in equilibrium with pure H2O fluid increases from about 2.3 ± 0.12 wt.% at 50 MPa to about 8.8 ± 0.16 wt.% at 500 MPa, whereas the concentration of CO2 increases from about 175 ± 15 to 3318 ± 276 ppm in the melts which were equilibrated with the most CO2-rich fluids (with mole fraction of CO2 in the fluid, XflCO2, from 0.70 to 0.95). In melts coexisting with H2O- and CO2-bearing fluids, the concentrations of dissolved H2O and CO2 in basaltic melt show a non-linear dependence on both total pressure and mole fraction of volatiles in the equilibrium fluid, which is in agreement with previous studies. A comparison of new experimental data with existing numerical solubility models for mixed H2O–CO2 fluids shows that the models do not adequately predict the solubility of volatiles in basaltic liquids at pressures above 200 MPa, in particular for CO2, implying that the models need to be recalibrated.

The experimental dataset presented in this study enables a quantitative interpretation of volatile concentrations in glass inclusions to evaluate the magma storage conditions and degassing paths of natural island arc basaltic systems. The experimental database covers the entire range of volatile compositions reported in the literature for natural melt inclusions in olivine from low- to mid-K basalts indicating that most melt inclusions were trapped or equilibrated at intermediate to shallow levels in magmatic systems (< 12–15 km).
Siebert L., Simkin T. Volcanoes of the World: an Illustrated Catalog of Holocene Volcanoes and their Eruptions. 2013.
Siebert L., Simkin T., Kimberly P. Volcanoes of the World. 2010. 568 p.    Annotation
This impressive scientific resource presents up-to-date information on ten thousand years of volcanic activity on Earth. In the decade and a half since the previous edition was published new studies have refined assessments of the ages of many volcanoes, and several thousand new eruptions have been documented. This edition updates the book's key components: a directory of volcanoes active during the Holocene; a chronology of eruptions over the past ten thousand years; a gazetteer of volcano names, synonyms, and subsidiary features; an extensive list of references; and an introduction placing these data in context. This edition also includes new photographs, data on the most common rock types forming each volcano, information on population densities near volcanoes, and other features, making it the most comprehensive source available on Earth's dynamic volcanism.
Simon A., Yogodzinski G.M., Robertson K., Smith E., Selyangin O., Kiryukhin A., Mulcahy S.R., Walker J.D. Evolution and genesis of volcanic rocks from Mutnovsky Volcano, Kamchatka // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2014. V. 286. P. 116 - 137. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.09.003.    Annotation
This study presents new geochemical data for Mutnovsky Volcano, located on the volcanic front of the southern portion of the Kamchatka arc. Field relationships show that Mutnovsky Volcano is comprised of four distinct stratocones, which have grown over that past 80 ka. The youngest center, Mutnovsky IV, has produced basalts and basaltic andesites only. The three older centers (Mutnovsky I, II, III) are dominated by basalt and basaltic andesite (60–80 by volume), but each has also produced small volumes of andesite and dacite. Across centers of all ages, Mutnovsky lavas define a tholeiitic igneous series, from 48–70 SiO2. Basalts and basaltic andesites have relatively low K2O and Na2O, and high FeO* and Al2O3 compared to volcanic rocks throughout Kamchatka. The mafic lavas are also depleted in the light rare earth elements (REEs), with chondrite-normalized La/Sm < 1.0. Andesites have generally higher REE abundances and are more enriched in light REEs, some showing negative Eu anomalies. All samples are depleted in field strength elements (HFSEs) relative to similarly incompatible REEs (e.g., low La/Ta, Nd/Hf compared to MORB), similar to island arc volcanic rocks worldwide. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf) are similar for samples from all four eruptive centers, and indicate that all samples were produced by melting of a similar source mixture. No clear age-progressive changes are evident in the compositions of Mutnovsky lavas. Mass balance and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) modeling of major and rare earth elements (REEs) indicate that basaltic andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine from a parental basalt, combined with assimilation of a melt composition similar to dacite lavas present at Mutnovsky. This modeling also indicates that andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase from basaltic andesite, combined with assimilation of dacite. Dacites erupted from Mutnovsky I and II have low abundances of REEs, and do not appear to be related to mafic magmas by FC or AFC processes. These dacites are modeled as the products of dehydration partial melting at mid-crustal levels of a garnet-free, amphibole-bearing basaltic rock, which itself formed in the mid-crust by emplacement of magma that originated from the same source as all Mutnovsky magmas. Lead isotope data indicate that subducted sediment is likely present in the source beneath Mutnovsky and most Kamchatka volcanoes, but uniformly radiogenic Hf and Nd in mafic samples (εNd = 8.7–9.3, εHf = 15.4–15.9), and significant variation in trace element ratios at nearly constant εNd and εHf, indicate that sediment plays a minor roll in controlling subduction trace element patterns in Mutnovsky lavas. Mafic lavas with Ba/Th > 450 require an aqueous fluid source component from subducting oceanic crust, but mixing patterns in isotope versus trace element ratio plots for Hf and the REEs (εNd and εHf vs. ratios with Ce, Nd and Hf) demonstrate that a source component with radiogenic Nd and Hf, and fractionated (arc-type) trace element ratios must be present in the source of Mutnovsky lavas. This source component, which is interpreted to be a partial melt of subducted basalt in the eclogite facies (eclogite melt source component), appears to be present in the source of all Kamchatka volcanoes. Cross-arc geochemical patterns at Mutnovsky and in other arc systems (Isu-Bonin, Tonga-Kermadec) suggest that the aqueous fluid component diminishes and the eclogite melt component is increased from volcanoes at the arc front compared to those in rear-arc positions.
Taran Yu.A., Pilipenko V.P., Rozhkov A.M., Vakin E.A. A geochemical model for fumaroles of the Mutnovsky volcano, Kamchatka, USSR // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 1992. V. 49. № 3–4. P. 269 - 283. doi: 10.1016/0377-0273(92)90018-9.    Annotation
On the basis of the chemical, isotopic and thermodynamic characteristics of fluids sampled between 1964 and 1989 a genetic model description is given for fumaroles of the Mutnovsky volcano. There are three individual groups of fumaroles in the Mutnovsky crater which show stable activity for a long period of time: “the Active Funnel” (temperatures exceed 600°C), the “Upper Field” (up to 320°C) and the “Bottom Field” (from 100 to 150°C). The three principal zones of emission have different gas composition, water isotopic composition, radioactivity and 3He/4He ratios. The abundance of magmatic components in the high-temperature fumaroles of the “Active Funnel” is much higher than those in gases from the other groups. Emission rate of SO2 from the “Active Funnel” is about 200 t/d, which requires complete degassing as a minimum of 1 km3 of magma every 20 years. Fluids of the “Upper Field” contain up to 80% of steam from the Mutnovsky geothermal system. Temperature variations of the “Bottom Field” fumaroles (from 97°C before 1982 to 151°C in 1989) result from changes in hydrological conditions in the crater. Evaporation of high-saline acid brine which is formed in the interior of the volcano is responsible for the composition of the “Bottom Field” gas-steam discharges.
VONA/KVERT Information Releases. 2005.
Volcano observatory notification to aviation (VONA/KVERT). 2011.
Waltham Tony A guide to the volcanoes of southern Kamchatka, Russia // Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 2001. V. 112. № 1. P. 67 - 78. doi: 10.1016/S0016-7878(01)80051-1.    Annotation
The remote sub-arctic wilderness of Kamchatka contains a line of active volcanoes above the Pacific Ocean plate subduction zone. This guide is based on the itinerary of the 1999 GA excursion to sites around Petropavlovsk. Descriptions cover the Uzon caldera and its Valley of Geysers, and the volcanoes of Avacha, Karimsky, Gorely and Mutnovsky.


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