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Records: 2010
Articles
Portnyagin Maxim, Hoernle Kaj, Plechov Pavel, Mironov Nikita, Khubunaya Sergey Constraints on mantle melting and composition and nature of slab components in volcanic arcs from volatiles (H2O, S, Cl, F) and trace elements in melt inclusions from the Kamchatka Arc // Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2007. Т. 255. № 1-2. С. 53-69. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.12.005.
Portnyagin Maxim, Ponomareva Vera Kliuchevskoi volcano diary // International Journal of Earth Sciences. 2012. Vol. 101. № 1. P. 195 doi:10.1007/s00531-011-0710-y.
   Annotation
Numerous ash layers deposited at the slopes of Kliuchevskoi volcano provide a detailed and continuous record of its explosive activity during the last ca. 10,000 years.
Ramsey Michael, Dehn Jonathan Spaceborne observations of the 2000 Bezymianny, Kamchatka eruption: the integration of high-resolution ASTER data into near real-time monitoring using AVHRR // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2004. Vol. 135. № 1-2. P. 127-146. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2003.12.014.
   Annotation
Since its launch in December 1999, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument has been observing over 1300 of the world's volcanoes during the day and night and at different times of the year. At the onset of an eruption, the temporal frequency of these regularly scheduled observations can be increased to as little as 1–3 days at higher latitudes. However, even this repeat time is not sufficient for near real-time monitoring, which is on the order of minutes to hours using poorer spatial resolution (>1 km/pixel) instruments. The eruption of Bezymianny Volcano (Kamchatkan Peninsula, Russia) in March 2000 was detected by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and also initiated an increased observation frequency for ASTER. A complete framework of the eruptive cycle from April 2000 to January 2001 was established, with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data used to monitor the large eruptions and produce the average yearly background state for the volcano. Twenty, nearly cloud-free ASTER scenes (2 days and 18 nights) show large thermal anomalies covering tens to hundreds of pixels and reveal both the actively erupting and restive (background) state of the volcano. ASTER short-wave infrared (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) data were also used to validate the recovered kinetic temperatures from the larger AVHRR pixels, as well as map the volcanic products and monitor the thermal features on the summit dome and surrounding small pyroclastic flows. These anomalies increase to greater than 90 °C prior to a larger eruption sequence in October 2000. In addition, ASTER has the first multispectral spaceborne TIR capability, which allowed for the modeling of micrometer-scale surface roughness (vesicularity) on the active lava dome. Where coupled with ongoing operational monitoring programs like those at AVO, ASTER data become extremely useful in discrimination of small surface targets in addition to providing enhanced volcanic mapping capabilities.
Rowell Colin R., Fee David, Szuberla Curt A.L., Arnoult Ken, Matoza Robin S., Firstov Pavel P., Kim Keehoon, Makhmudov Evgeniy Three-dimensional volcano-acoustic source localization at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2014. Vol. 283. P. 101 - 115. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.06.015.
   Annotation
Abstract We test two methods of 3-D acoustic source localization on volcanic explosions and small-scale jetting events at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Recent infrasound studies have provided evidence that volcanic jets produce low-frequency aerodynamic sound (jet noise) similar to that from man-made jet engines. For man-made jet noise, noise sources localize along the turbulent jet flow downstream of the nozzle. Discrimination of jet noise sources along the axis of a volcanic jet requires high resolution in the vertical dimension, which is very difficult to achieve with typical volcano-acoustic network geometries. At Karymsky Volcano, an eroded edifice (Dvor Caldera) adjacent to the active cone provided a platform for the deployment of five infrasound sensors in July 2012 with intra-network relief of ~ 600 m. The network was designed to target large-scale jetting, but unfortunately only small-scale jetting and explosions were recorded during the 12-day experiment. A novel 3-D inverse localization method, srcLoc, is tested and compared against a more common grid-search semblance technique. Simulations using synthetic signals show that srcLoc is capable of determining vertical solutions to within ± 150 m or better (for signal-to-noise ratios ≥ 1) for this network configuration. However, srcLoc locations for explosions and small-scale jetting at Karymsky Volcano show a persistent overestimation of source elevation and underestimation of sound speed. The semblance method provides more realistic source locations, likely because it uses a fixed, realistic sound speed of ~ 340 m/s. Explosion waveforms exhibit amplitude relationships and waveform distortion strikingly similar to those theorized by modeling studies of wave diffraction around the crater rim. We suggest that the delay of acoustic signals and apparent elevated source locations are due to raypaths altered by topography and/or crater diffraction effects, implying that topography in the vent region must be accounted for when attempting 3-D volcano acoustic source localization. Though the data presented here are insufficient to resolve small-scale jet noise sources, similar techniques may be successfully applied to large volcanic jets in the future.
Rulenko O.P. Volcanic Cloud Electrification // Volcanology and Seismology. 1988. Vol. 7. № 2. P. 253-272.
Senyukov S.L., Nuzhdina I.N., Droznina S.Ya., Garbuzova V.T., Kozhevnikova T.Yu., Sobolevskaya O.V., Nazarova Z.A., Bliznetsov V.E. Reprint of "Seismic monitoring of the Plosky Tolbachik eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka Peninsula Russia)" // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 47 - 59. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.07.026.
   Annotation
Abstract The active basaltic volcano Plosky Tolbachik (Pl. Tolbachik) is located in the southern part of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group on the Kamchatka Peninsula. The previous 1975–1976 Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (1975–1976 GTFE) occurred in the southern sector of Pl. Tolbachik. It was preceded by powerful earthquakes with local magnitudes between 2.5 and 4.9 and it was successfully predicted with a short-term forecast. The Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Survey (KBGS) of the Russian Academy of Science (RAS) began to publish the results of daily seismic monitoring of active Kamchatka volcanoes on the Internet in 2000. Unlike the 1975–1976 {GTFE} precursor, (1) seismicity before the 2012–2013 Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (2012–2013 TFE) was relatively weak and earthquake magnitudes did not exceed 2.5. (2) Precursory earthquake hypocenters at 0–5 km depth were concentrated mainly under the southeastern part of the volcano. (3) The frequency of events gradually increased in September 2012, and rose sharply on the eve of the eruption. (4) According to seismic data, the explosive-effusive 2012–2013 {TFE} began at ~ 05 h 15 min {UTC} on November 27, 2012; the outbreak occurred between the summit of the Pl. Tolbachik and the Northern Breakthrough of the 1975–1976 GTFE. (5) Because of bad weather, early interpretations of the onset time and the character of the eruption were made using seismological data only and were confirmed later by other monitoring methods. The eruption finished in early September 2013. This article presents the data obtained through real-time seismic monitoring and the results of retrospective analysis, with additional comments on the future monitoring of volcanic activity.
Shcherbakov Vasily D., Neill Owen K., Izbekov Pavel E., Plechov Pavel Yu. Phase equilibria constraints on pre-eruptive magma storage conditions for the 1956 eruption of Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2013. Vol. 263. P. 132-140. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2013.02.010.
Shellnutt J. Gregory, Belousov Alexander, Belousova Marina, Wang Kuo-Lung, Zellmer Georg F. Generation of calc-alkaline andesite of the Tatun volcanic group (Taiwan) within an extensional environment by crystal fractionation // International Geology Review. 2014. Vol. 56. № 9. P. 1156-1171. doi:10.1080/00206814.2014.921865.
Sheymovich V.S. The geologic structure of stratovolcanoes // International Geology Review. 1985. Vol. 27. № 7. P. 798-809. doi:10.1080/00206818509466467.
Shirokov V.A. Estimation of the Mass and Volume of Tephra from Volcanic Eruptions // Volcanology and Seismology. 1989. Vol. 7. № 5. P. 683-700.