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Records: 1974
Articles
Carter Adam J., Ramsey Michael S., Belousov Alexander B. Detection of a new summit crater on Bezymianny Volcano lava dome: satellite and field-based thermal data // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2007. Vol. 69. № 7. P. 811-815. doi:10.1007/s00445-007-0113-x.
Caudron Corentin, Taisne Benoit, Kugaenko Yulia, Saltykov Vadim Magma migration at the onset of the 2012–13 Tolbachik eruption revealed by Seismic Amplitude Ratio Analysis // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 60 - 67. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.09.010.
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Abstract In contrast of the 1975–76 Tolbachik eruption, the 2012–13 Tolbachik eruption was not preceded by any striking change in seismic activity. By processing the Klyuchevskoy volcano group seismic data with the Seismic Amplitude Ratio Analysis (SARA) method, we gain insights into the dynamics of magma movement prior to this important eruption. A clear seismic migration within the seismic swarm, started 20 hours before the reported eruption onset (05:15 UTC, 26 November 2012). This migration proceeded in different phases and ended when eruptive tremor, corresponding to lava flows, was recorded (at ~ 11:00 UTC, 27 November 2012). In order to get a first order approximation of the magma location, we compare the calculated seismic intensity ratios with the theoretical ones. As expected, the observations suggest that the seismicity migrated toward the eruption location. However, we explain the pre-eruptive observed ratios by a vertical migration under the northern slope of Plosky Tolbachik volcano followed by a lateral migration toward the eruptive vents. Another migration is also captured by this technique and coincides with a seismic swarm that started 16–20 km to the south of Plosky Tolbachik at 20:31 {UTC} on November 28 and lasted for more than 2 days. This seismic swarm is very similar to the seismicity preceding the 1975–76 Tolbachik eruption and can be considered as a possible aborted eruption.
Chaplygin Ilya, Yudovskaya Marina, Vergasova Lidiya, Mokhov Andrey Native gold from volcanic gases at Tolbachik 1975–76 and 2012–13 Fissure Eruptions, Kamchatka // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 200 - 209. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.08.018.
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Abstract Aggregates and euhedral crystals of native gold were found in sublimates formed during New Tolbachik Fissure Eruption in 2012–2013 (NTFE). Gold-bearing sublimate samples were taken from a red-hot (690 °C) degassing fracture in the roof of an active lava tunnel 1.5 km from active Naboko cinder cone in May 2013. The gas condensate collected at 690 °C in this site contains 16 ppb Au, 190 ppb Ag and 1180 ppm Cu compared to 3 ppb Au, 39 ppb Ag and 9.7 ppm Cu in the condensate of pristine magmatic gas sampled at 1030 °C. The 690 °C volcanic gas is most likely a mix of magmatic gas and local snow buried under the lava flows as indicated by oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of the condensate. The lower-temperature gas enrichment in gold, copper and chlorine is resulted from evaporation of the 690 °C condensate during forced gas pumping at sampling. Native gold was also found in fumarolic encrustations collected from caverns in basalt lava flows with temperature up to 600 °C in June 2014, in a year after eruption finished. The native gold precipitation in newly formed Cu-rich sublimates together with the well known gold occurrences in cinder cones of 1975–1976 Large Tolbachik Fissure Eruption manifest a transport capability of oxidized volcanic gas.
Chubarova O.S., Gorelchik V.I., Garbuzova V.T. Seismic Activity of Bezymyannyi Volcano in 1975-1979 // Volcanology and Seismology. 1983. № 3. P. 303-314.
Churikova T., Dorendorf F., Wörner G. Sources and Fluids in the Mantle Wedge below Kamchatka, Evidence from Across-arc Geochemical Variation // Journal of Petrology. 2001. Vol. 42. № 8. P. 1567-1593. doi:10.1093/petrology/42.8.1567.
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Major and trace element and Sr–Nd–Pb isotopic variations in mafic volcanic rocks hve been studied in a 220 km transect across the Kamchatka arc from the Eastern Volcanic Front, over the Central Kamchatka Depression to the Sredinny Ridge in the back-arc. Thirteen volcanoes and lava fields, from 110 to 400 km above the subducted slab, were sampled. This allows us to characterize spatial variations and the relative amount and composition of the slab fluid involved in magma genesis. Typical Kamchatka arc basalts, normalized for fractionation to 6% MgO, display a strong increase in large ion lithophile, light rare earth and high field strength elements from the arc front to the back-arc. Ba/Zr and Ce/Pb ratios, however, are nearly constant across the arc, which suggests a similar fluid input for Ba and Pb. La/Yb and Nb/Zr increase from the arc front to the back-arc. Rocks from the Central Kamchatka Depression range in 87Sr/86Sr from 0·70334 to 0·70366, but have almost constant Nd isotopic compositions (143Nd/144Nd 0·51307–0·51312). This correlates with the highest U/Th ratios in these rocks. Pb-isotopic ratios are mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like but decrease slightly from the volcanic front to the back-arc. The initial mantle source ranged from N-MORB-like in the volcanic front and Central Kamchatka Depression to more enriched in the back-arc. This enriched component is similar to an ocean-island basalt (OIB) source. Variations in (CaO)6·0–(Na2O)6·0 show that degree of melting decreases from the arc front to the Central Kamchatka Depression and remains constant from there to the Sredinny Ridge. Calculated fluid compositions have a similar trace element pattern across the arc, although minor differences are implied. A model is presented that quantifies the various mantle components (variably depleted N-MORB-mantle and enriched OIB-mantle) and the fluid compositions added to this mantle wedge. The amount of fluid added ranges from 0·7 to 2·1%. The degree of melting changes from ∼20% at the arc front to <10% below the back-arc region. The rocks from volcanoes of the northern part of the Central Kamchatka Depression—to the north of the transect considered in this study—are significantly different in their trace element compositions compared with the other rocks of the transect and their source appears to have been enriched by a component derived from melting of the edge of the ruptured slab.
Churikova T.G., Gordeychik B.N., Edwards B.R., Ponomareva V.V., Zelenin E.A. The Tolbachik volcanic massif: A review of the petrology, volcanology and eruption history prior to the 2012–2013 eruption // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 3 - 21. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.10.016.
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The primary goal of this paper is to summarize all of the published data on the Tolbachik volcanic massif in order to provide a clear framework for the geochronologic, petrologic, geochemical and to a lesser extent the geophysical and tectonic characteristics of the Tolbachik system established prior to the 2012–2013 eruption. The Tolbachik massif forms the southwestern part of the voluminous Klyuchevskoy volcanic group in Kamchatka. The massif includes two large stratovolcanoes, Ostry (“Sharp”) Tolbachik and Plosky (“Flat”) Tolbachik, and a 70 km long zone of the basaltic monogenetic cones that form an arcuate rift-like structure running across the Plosky Tolbachik summit. The Tolbachik massif gained international attention after the 1975–1976 Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (GTFE), which was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century and one of the six largest basaltic fissure eruptions in historical time. By the end of the GTFE, 2.2 km3 of volcanic products of variable basaltic compositions with MORB-like isotopic characteristics covered an area of > 1000 km2. During the following three decades more than 700 papers on various aspects of this eruption have been published both in national and international journals. Although the recent 2012–2013 eruption, which is the main topic of this volume, was not as long as the {GTFE} in duration or as large in area and volume of the erupted deposits, it brought to the surface a unique volcanic material never found before. In order to understand the data from new eruptions and make significant progress towards a better understanding of the Tolbachik magmatic system it is important to be able to put the new results into the historic context of previous research.
Churikova T.G., Ivanov B.V., Eichelberger J., Wörner G., Browne B., Izbekov P. Major and trace element zoning in plagioclase from Kizimen Volcano (Kamchatka): Insights into magma-chamber processes // Journal of Volcanology and Seismology. 2013. Vol. 7. № 2. P. 112-130. doi:10.1134/S0742046313020024.
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The data on the geochemistry of the rocks of Kizimen Volcano and results of microprobe studies of major and trace elements in plagioclase grains from acid lavas and basalt inclusions are presented. The characteristics of the Kizimen Volcano are the following: (1) basalt inclusions are abundant in acid lavas; (2) banded, mixed lavas occur; (3) the distribution curves of rare earth elements of acidic lavas and basalt inclusions intersect; (4) Sr–Nd isotope systematics of the rocks and inclusions do not indicate mixture with crustal material; (5) plagioclase phenocrysts are of direct and reverse zonation; (6) olivine and hornblende, as well as acid and mafic plagioclases, coexist in the rocks. The studies revealed that the rocks are of a hybrid nature and originated in the course of repeated mixture of acid and mafic melts either with chemical and ther mal interaction of melts or exclusively thermal ones. Study of the major and trace element distribution in zonal minerals provides an informative tool for understanding the history of the generation and evolution of melts in a magma chamber
Churikova Tatiana G., Gordeychik Boris N., Ivanov Boris V., Wörner Gerhard Relationship between Kamen Volcano and the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes (Kamchatka) // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2013. Vol. 263. P. 3 - 21. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2013.01.019.
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Abstract Data on the geology, petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of rocks from Kamen Volcano (Central Kamchatka Depression) are presented and compared with rocks from the neighbouring active volcanoes. The rocks from Kamen and Ploskie Sopky volcanoes differ systematically in major elemental and mineral compositions and could not have been produced from the same primary melts. The compositional trends of Kamen stratovolcano lavas and dikes are clearly distinct from those of Klyuchevskoy lavas in all major and trace element diagrams as well as in mineral composition. However, lavas of the monogenetic cones on the southwestern slope of Kamen Volcano are similar to the moderately high-Mg basalts from Klyuchevskoy and may have been derived from the same primary melts. This means that the monogenetic cones of Kamen Volcano represent the feeding magma for Klyuchevskoy Volcano. Rocks from Kamen stratovolcano and Bezymianny form a common trend on all major element diagrams, indicating their genetic proximity. This suggests that Bezymianny Volcano inherited the feeding magma system of extinct Kamen Volcano. The observed geochemical diversity of rocks from the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes can be explained as the result of both gradual depletion over time of the mantle N-MORB-type source due to the intense previous magmatic events in this area, and the addition of distinct fluids to this mantle source.
Churikova Tatiana G., Gordeychik Boris N., Iwamori Hikaru, Nakamura Hitomi, Ishizuka Osamu, Nishizawa Tatsuji, Haraguchi Satoru, Miyazaki Takashi, Vaglarov Bogdan S. Petrological and geochemical evolution of the Tolbachik volcanic massif, Kamchatka, Russia // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 156 - 181. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.10.026.
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Data on the geology, petrography, and geochemistry of Middle–Late-Pleistocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic massif (Kamchatka, Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes) are presented and compared with rocks from the neighboring Mount Povorotnaya, Klyuchevskaya group basement, and Holocene–historical Tolbachik monogenetic cones. Two volcanic series of lavas, middle-K and high-K, are found in the Tolbachik massif. The results of our data analysis and computer modeling of crystallization at different P–T–H2O–fO2 conditions allow us to reconstruct the geochemical history of the massif. The Tolbachik volcanic massif started to form earlier than 86 ka based on K–Ar dating. During the formation of the pedestal and the lower parts of the stratovolcanoes, the middle-K melts, depleted relative to NMORB, fractionated in water-rich conditions (about 3 of H2O). At the Late Pleistocene–Holocene boundary, a large fissure zone was initiated and the geodynamical regime changed. Upwelling associated with intra-arc rifting generated melting from the same mantle source that produced magmas more enriched in incompatible trace elements and subduction components; these magmas are high-K, not depleted relative to N-MORB melts with island arc signatures and rift-like characteristics. The fissure opening caused degassing during magma ascent, and the high-K melts fractionated at anhydrous conditions. These high-K rocks contributed to the formation of the upper parts of stratovolcanoes. At the beginning of Holocene, the high-K rocks became prevalent and formed cinder cones and associated lava fields along the fissure zone. However, some features, including 1975–1976 Northern Breakthrough, are represented by middle-K high-Mg rocks, suggesting that both middle-K and high-K melts still exist in the Tolbachik system. Our results show that fractional crystallization at different water conditions and a variably depleted upper mantle source are responsible for all observed variations in rocks within the Tolbachik volcanic massif. Sr–Nd isotopes are consistent with 2–4 crustal assimilation during formation of the pedestal and stratovolcanoes, while the young lava fields do not show evidence of crustal assimilation. Major and trace element data coupled with K–Ar dating provide strong evidence that Mount Povorotnaya, located in 8 km northeast of Plosky Tolbachik, is an old block of the Tolbachik massif pedestal and for the moment it is the oldest (306 ka) known object in Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes.
Churikova Tatiana, Gordeychik Boris, Wörner Gerhard, Flerov Gleb, Hartmann Gerald, Simon Klaus Geochemical evolution of Bolshaya Udina, Malaya Udina, and Gorny Zub volcanoes, Klyuchevskaya Group (Kamchatka) // Geophysical Research Abstracts. 2017. Vol. 19. P. EGU2017-10691.
   Annotation
The Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes (KGV) located in the northern part of Kamchatka has the highest magma production rate for any arc worldwide and several of its volcanoes have been studied in considerable detail [e.g. Kersting & Arculus, 1995; Pineau et al., 1999; Dorendorf et al., 2000; Ozerov, 2000; Churikova et al., 2001, 2012, 2015; Mironov et al., 2001; Portnyagin et al., 2007, 2015; Turner et al., 2007]. However, some volcanoes of the KGV including Late-Pleistocene volcanoes Bolshaya Udina, Malaya Udina, Ostraya Zimina, Ovalnaya Zimina, and Gorny Zub were studied only on a reconnaissance basis [Timerbaeva, 1967; Ermakov, 1977] and the modern geochemical studies have not been carried out at all. Among the volcanoes of KGV these volcanoes are closest to the arc trench and may hold information on geochemical zonation with respect to across arc source variations. We present the first major and trace element data on rocks from these volcanoes as well as on their basement. All rocks are medium-calc-alkaline basaltic andesites to dacites except few low-Mg basalts from Malaya Udina volcano. Phenocrysts are mainly olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase and magnetite, Hb-bearing andesites and dacites are rarely found only in subvolcanic intrusions at Bolshaya Udina volcano. Lavas are geochemically similar to the active Bezymianny volcano, however, individual variations for each volcano exist in both major and trace elements. Trace element geochemistry is typical of island arc volcanism. Compared to KGV lavas all studied rocks form very narrow trends in all major element diagrams, which almost do not overlap with the fields of other KGV volcanoes. The lavas are relatively poor in alkalis, TiO2, P2O5, FeO, Ni, Zr, and enriched in SiO2 compared to other KGV volcanics and show greater geochemical and petrological evidence of magmatic differentiation during shallow crustal processing. Basement samples of the Udinskoe plateau lavas to the east of Bolshaya Udina volcano have similar geochemical composition (trace element enriched high-K basaltic andesites and andesites) and similar eruption age of 274 ka [Calkins et al., 2004] as typical plateau lavas below the northern KGV. This research was supported by RFBR-DFG grant # 16-55-12040.