Ushkovsky Volcano. Bibliography
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Muravyev Y.D., Shiraiwa T. 400 years of climatic change in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia: paleoglaciologic, tree-ring and ice-core evidance // Proceedings International Workshop. Matsuyama, Japan, 2002. 2002. P. 76-91.
Ovsyannikov A.A., Khrenov A.P., Muravyev Y.D. Recent Fumarole Activity on Dal'nii Ploskii Volcano // Volcanology and Seismology. 1989. Vol. 7. № 5. P. 815-817.
Ponomareva V.V., Churikova T., Melekestsev I.V., Braitseva O.A., Pevzner M., Sulerzhitskii L. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Volcanism on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Northwest Pacific Region / Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region. Washington, D. C.: American Geophysical Union. 2007. Vol. 172. P. 165-198. doi: 10.1029/172GM15.
   Annotation
Late Pleistocene-Holocene volcanism in Kamchatka results from the subduction of the
Pacific Plate under the peninsula and forms three volcanic belts arranged in en echelon manner
from southeast to northwest. The cross-arc extent of recent volcanism exceeds 250 km and
is one of the widest worldwide. All the belts are dominated by mafic rocks. Eruptives with
SiO2>57% constitute ~25% of the most productive Central Kamchatka Depression belt and
~30% of the Eastern volcanic front, but <10% of the least productive Sredinny Range belt.
All the Kamchatka volcanic rocks exhibit typical arc-type signatures and are represented
by basalt-rhyolite series differing in alkalis. Typical Kamchatka arc basalts display a strong
increase in LILE, LREE and HFSE from the front to the back-arc. La/Yb and Nb/Zr increase
from the arc front to the back arc while B/Li and As, Sb, B, Cl and S concentrations decrease.
The initial mantle source below Kamchatka ranges from N-MORB-like in the volcanic front
and Central Kamchatka Depression to more enriched in the back arc. Rocks from the Central
Kamchatka Depression range in 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.70334 to 0.70366, but have almost
constant Nd isotopic ratios (143Nd/144Nd 0.51307–0.51312). This correlates with the highest
U/Th ratios in these rocks and suggest the highest fluid-flux in the source region.
Holocene large eruptions and eruptive histories of individual Holocene volcanoes have been
studied with the help of tephrochronology and 14C dating that permits analysis of time-space
patterns of volcanic activity, evolution of the erupted products, and volcanic hazards.
Ponomareva V.V., Pendea I. Florin, Zelenin Egor, Portnyagin Maxim, Gorbach N.V., Pevzner M.M., Plechova A.A., Derkachev Alexander, Rogozin Aleksei, Garbe-Schönberg Dieter The first continuous late Pleistocene tephra record from Kamchatka Peninsula (NW Pacific) and its volcanological and paleogeographic implications // Quaternary Science Reviews. 2021. Vol. 257. 1. № Article 106838. P. 1-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2021.106838.
   Annotation
The Kamchatka volcanic arc (NW Pacific) is one of the most productive arcs in the world, known for its highly explosive activity. At the same time, the Kamchatkan record of late Pleistocene explosive eruptions has remained fragmentary. Here we present the first continuous record of Kamchatkan explosive activity between ~12 and 30 ka, which includes ~70 eruptions and extends the earlier reconstructed Holocene sequence for another 20 ka. Our record is based on geochemical correlations of 14C-dated tephras that represent all Kamchatka volcanic zones and are buried in lacustrine deposits along the 200 km stretch of the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD). The accompanying geochemical database of volcanic glass compositions includes 3104 new electron microprobe and 221 LA-ICP-MS analyses. The data show that during the period under study, large silicic explosive eruptions peaked at 30e25 ka. Later times were mostly associated with the moderate activity from northern CKD volcanoes Shiveluch and Zarechny. Our tephra record provides the first tephrochronological model for dating and correlating Central Kamchatka late Pleistocene deposits and gives us some insight into the timing of glacial advances in the Kliuchevskoi volcanic group and volcanic response to the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum and glacial unloading at its termination. In addition, studied sections of lacustrine deposits tightly linked by tephra markers suggest the existence of a large lake system within the CKD for ~20 kyr until its final discharge at ~12 ka BP.
Ponomareva Vera V., Melekestsev Ivan V., Dirksen Oleg V. Sector collapses and large landslides on Late Pleistocene–Holocene volcanoes in Kamchatka, Russia // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2006. Vol. 158. № 1-2. P. 117-138. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2006.04.016.
   Annotation
On Kamchatka, detailed geologic and geomorphologic mapping of young volcanic terrains and observations on historical eruptions reveal that landslides of various scales, from small (0.001 km3) to catastrophic (up to 20–30 km3), are widespread. Moreover, these processes are among the most effective and most rapid geomorphic agents. Of 30 recently active Kamchatka volcanoes, at least 18 have experienced sector collapses, some of them repetitively. The largest sector collapses identified so far on Kamchatka volcanoes, with volumes of 20–30 km3 of resulting debris-avalanche deposits, occurred at Shiveluch and Avachinsky volcanoes in the Late Pleistocene. During the last 10,000 yr the most voluminous sector collapses have occurred on extinct Kamen' (4–6 km3) and active Kambalny (5–10 km3) volcanoes. The largest number of repetitive debris avalanches (> 10 during just the Holocene) has occurred at Shiveluch volcano. Landslides from the volcanoes cut by ring-faults of the large collapse calderas were ubiquitous. Large failures have happened on both mafic and silicic volcanoes, mostly related to volcanic activity. Orientation of collapse craters is controlled by local tectonic stress fields rather than regional fault systems.

Specific features of some debris avalanche deposits are toreva blocks — huge almost intact fragments of volcanic edifices involved in the failure; some have been erroneously mapped as individual volcanoes. One of the largest toreva blocks is Mt. Monastyr' — a ∼ 2 km3 piece of Avachinsky Somma involved in a major sector collapse 30–40 ka BP.

Long-term forecast of sector collapses on Kliuchevskoi, Koriaksky, Young Cone of Avachinsky and some other volcanoes highlights the importance of closer studies of their structure and stability.
Ponomareva Vera, Portnyagin Maxim, Derkachev Alexander, Pendea I. Florin, Bourgeois Joanne, Reimer Paula J., Garbe-Schönberg Dieter, Krasheninnikov Stepan, Nürnberg Dirk Early Holocene M~6 explosive eruption from Plosky volcanic massif (Kamchatka) and its tephra as a link between terrestrial and marine paleoenvironmental records // International Journal of Earth Sciences. 2013. Vol. 102. № 6. P. 1673-1699. doi:10.1007/s00531-013-0898-0.
   Annotation
We report tephrochronological and geochemical data on early Holocene activity from Plosky volcanic massif in the Kliuchevskoi volcanic group, Kamchatka Peninsula. Explosive activity of this volcano lasted for ~1.5 kyr, produced a series of widely dispersed tephra layers, and was followed by profuse low-viscosity lava flows. This eruptive episode started a major reorganization of the volcanic structures in the western part of the Kliuchevskoi volcanic group. An explosive eruption from Plosky (M~6), previously unstudied, produced tephra (coded PL2) of a volume of 10–12 km3 (11–13 Gt), being one of the largest Holocene explosive eruptions in Kamchatka. Characteristic diagnostic features of the PL2 tephra are predominantly vitric sponge-shaped fragments with rare phenocrysts and microlites of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxenes, medium- to high-K basaltic andesitic bulk composition, high-K, high-Al and high-P trachyandesitic glass composition with SiO2 = 57.5–59.5 wt%, K2O = 2.3–2.7 wt%, Al2O3 = 15.8–16.5 wt%, and P2O5 = 0.5–0.7 wt%. Other diagnostic features include a typical subduction-related pattern of incompatible elements, high concentrations of all REE (>10× mantle values), moderate enrichment in LREE (La/Yb ~ 5.3), and non-fractionated mantle-like pattern of LILE. Geochemical fingerprinting of the PL2 tephra with the help of EMP and LA-ICP-MS analyses allowed us to map its occurrence in terrestrial sections across Kamchatka and to identify this layer in Bering Sea sediment cores at a distance of >600 km from the source. New high-precision 14C dates suggest that the PL2 eruption occurred ~10,200 cal BP, which makes it a valuable isochrone for early Holocene climate fluctuations and permits direct links between terrestrial and marine paleoenvironmental records. The terrestrial and marine 14C dates related to the PL2 tephra have allowed us to estimate an early Holocene reservoir age for the western Bering Sea at 1,410 ± 64 14C years. Another important tephra from the early Holocene eruptive episode of Plosky volcano, coded PL1, was dated at 11,650 cal BP. This marker is the oldest geochemically characterized and dated tephra marker layer in Kamchatka to date and is an important local marker for the Younger Dryas—early Holocene transition. One more tephra from Plosky, coded PL3, can be used as a marker northeast of the source at a distance of ~110 km.
Siebert L., Simkin T., Kimberly P. Volcanoes of the World. Berkeley: University of California Press. 2010. 568 p.
   Annotation
This impressive scientific resource presents up-to-date information on ten thousand years of volcanic activity on Earth. In the decade and a half since the previous edition was published new studies have refined assessments of the ages of many volcanoes, and several thousand new eruptions have been documented. This edition updates the book's key components: a directory of volcanoes active during the Holocene; a chronology of eruptions over the past ten thousand years; a gazetteer of volcano names, synonyms, and subsidiary features; an extensive list of references; and an introduction placing these data in context. This edition also includes new photographs, data on the most common rock types forming each volcano, information on population densities near volcanoes, and other features, making it the most comprehensive source available on Earth's dynamic volcanism.
VONA/KVERT Information Releases. 2005.
Volcano observatory notification to aviation (VONA/KVERT). 2011.
Виноградов В.Н. Ледник Бильченок // Вопросы географии Камчатки. 1965. Вып. 3. С. 111-115.