Main Volcanoes Kudryavy

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8.3 Medvezhii
Kudryavy Volcano. Bibliography

 
Records: 16
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Botcharnikov Roman E., Shmulovich Kirill I., Tkachenko Sergey I., Korzhinsky Mikhail A., Rybin Alexander V. Hydrogen isotope geochemistry and heat balance of a fumarolic system: Kudriavy volcano, Kuriles // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2003. V. 124. № 1-2. P. 45-66. doi:10.1016/S0377-0273(03)00043-X.    Annotation
The temperature and hydrogen isotope composition of the fumarolic gases have been studied at Kudriavy volcano, Kurile Islands, which is unique for investigating the processes of magma degassing because of the occurrence of numerous easily accessible fumaroles with a temperature range of 100–940°C. There are several local fumarolic fields with a total surface area of about 2600 m2 within the flattened crater of 200×600 m. Each fumarolic field is characterized by the occurrence of high- and low-temperature fumaroles with high gas discharges and steaming areas with lower temperatures. We have studied the thermal budget of the Kudriavy fumarolic system on the basis of the quantitative dependences of the hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) and tritium concentration on the temperature of fumarolic gases and compared them with the calculated heat balance of mixing between hot magmatic gas and cold meteoric water. Hydrogen isotope composition (δD and 3H) shows a well expressed correlation with the gas temperature. Since D/H ratio and 3H are good indicators of water sources in volcanic areas, it suggests that the thermal budget of the fumarolic system is mostly controlled by the admixing of meteoric waters to magmatic gases. The convective mechanism of heat transfer in the hydrothermal system governs the maximum temperatures of local fumaroles and fumarolic fields. Low-temperature fumaroles at Kudriavy are thermally buffered by the boiling processes of meteoric waters in the mixing zone at pressures of 3–12 bar. These values may correspond to the hydrostatic pressure of water columns about 30–120 m in height in the volcanic edifice and hence to the depth of a mixing/boiling zone. Conductive heat transfer is governed by conductive heat exchange between gases and country rocks and appears to be responsible for the temperature distribution around a local fumarolic vent. The temperature and pressure of shallow degassing magma are estimated to be 1050°C and 2–3 bar, respectively. The length of the ‘main’ fumarolic gas conduit is estimated to be about 80 m from the linear correlation between maximal temperatures of fumarolic fields and distances to the highest-temperature ‘F-940’ fumarole. This value may correspond to the depth of an apical part of the magmatic chamber. The geometry of the crater zone at the Kudriavy summit and the model of convective gas cooling suggest different hydrostatic pressures in the hydrothermal system at the base of high- and low-temperature gas conduits. The depths of gas sources for low-temperature fumaroles are evaluated to be about 200 m at the periphery of the magma chamber.
Gorshkov G.S. Kurile Islands // Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields. 1958. P. 1-99.
Gorshkov G.S. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle: Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. 1970. 385 p. № 10.1007/978-1-4684-1767-8.    Annotation
The present volume seems to me to be a particularly im­ portant one for several reasons. Not least among these is the fact that it summarizes the work of two decades by G. S. Gorshkov, one of the world's leading volcanologists. In addition, it is the first general work of this length on the volcanism of what might be called a "narrow" island arc, a relatively simple megastructure as com­ pared with the "wide" arcs such as Japan and Indonesia. Finally, in this volume Gorshkov has summarized and cited extensive evi­ dence for his general ideas on the relation between volcanism and the earth's crust and mantle. A few potentially troublesome items should be noted here. In the translation the Russian terms "suite" and "series" have been retained, though for American readers these might better have been translated as "formation" and "group. " In almost all cases Russian place names have simply been transliterated rather than translated (e. g. , "Yuzhnyi Isthmus" rather than "South Isthmus"); in a few cases the English equivalent has been given in brackets where this is essential to the understanding of the author's com­ ments. The adjectives have retained their Russian case endings in the process (masculine -yi or -ii, feminine -aya or -'ya, neuter -oe) and this may occasionally lead to some slight confusion, for example, when the author calls a given feature Severnyi Volcano at one point and Severnaya Mountain at another.
Melnikov Dmitry, Malik Nataliya, Chaplygin Ilya, Zelenski Mikhail First data on the volatile fluxes from passively degassing volcanoes of the Kuril Island arc // EGU General Assembly 2017. 2017. V. 19.
Siebert L., Simkin T. Volcanoes of the World: an Illustrated Catalog of Holocene Volcanoes and their Eruptions. 2013.
Siebert L., Simkin T., Kimberly P. Volcanoes of the World. 2010. 568 p.    Annotation
This impressive scientific resource presents up-to-date information on ten thousand years of volcanic activity on Earth. In the decade and a half since the previous edition was published new studies have refined assessments of the ages of many volcanoes, and several thousand new eruptions have been documented. This edition updates the book's key components: a directory of volcanoes active during the Holocene; a chronology of eruptions over the past ten thousand years; a gazetteer of volcano names, synonyms, and subsidiary features; an extensive list of references; and an introduction placing these data in context. This edition also includes new photographs, data on the most common rock types forming each volcano, information on population densities near volcanoes, and other features, making it the most comprehensive source available on Earth's dynamic volcanism.
Taran Yu.A., Hedenquist J.W., Korzhinsky M.A., Tkachenko S.I., Shmulovich K.I. Geochemistry of magmatic gases from Kudryavy volcano, Iturup, Kuril Islands // Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 1995. V. 59. № 9. P. 1749 - 1761. doi: 10.1016/0016-7037(95)00079-F.    Annotation
Volcanic vapors were collected during 1990–1993 from the summit crater of Kudryavy, a basaltic andesite volcano on Iturup island in the Kuril arc. The highest temperature (700–940°C) fumarolic discharges are water rich (94–98 mole% H2O and have δD values of −20 to −12%o. The chemical and water isotope compositions of the vapors (temperature of thirteen samples, 940 to 130°C) show a simple trend of mixing between hot magmatic fluid and meteoric water; the magmatic parent vapor is similar in composition to altered seawater. The origin of this endmember is not known; it may be connate seawater, or possibly caused by the shallow incorporation of seawater into the magmatic-hydrothermal system. Samples of condensed vapor from 535 to 940°C fumaroles have major element trends indicating contamination by wall-rock particles. However, the enrichment factors (relative to the host rock) of many of the trace elements indicate another source; these elements likely derive from a degassing magma. The strongest temperature dependence is for Re, Mo, W, Cu, and Co; highly volatile elements such as Cl, I, F, Bi, Cd, B, and Br show little temperature dependence. The Re abundance in high-temperature condensates is 2–10 ppb, sufficient to form the pure Re sulfide recently discovered in sublimates of Kudryavy. Anomalously high I concentrations (1–12 ppm) may be caused by magma-marine sediment interaction, as Br/I ratios are similar to those in marine sediments.

The high-temperature (>700°C) fumaroles have a relatively constant composition (∼2 mol% each C and S species, with SO2/H2S ratio of about 3:1, and 0.5 mol% HCl); as temperature decreases, both St and CI are depleted, most likely due to formation of native S and HCl absorption by condensed liquid, in addition to the dilution by meteoric water. Thermochemical evaluation of the high-temperature gas compositions indicates they are close to equilibrium mixtures, apart from minor loss of H2O and oxidation of CO and H2 during sampling. Calculation to an assumed equilibrium state indicates temperatures from 705 to 987°C. At high temperature (≈900°C), the redox states are close to the overlap of mineral (quartz-fayalite-magnetite and nickel-nickel oxide) and gas (H2OH2SO2H2S) buffer curves, due to heterogeneous reaction between the melt and gas species. At lower temperatures (<800°C), the trend of the redox state is similar to the gas buffer curve, probably caused by homogeneous reaction among gas species in a closed system during vapor ascent.
Taran Yuri, Zelenski Mikhail, Chaplygin Ilya, Malik Natalia, Campion Robin, Inguaggiato Salvatore, Pokrovsky Boris, Kalacheva Elena, Melnikov Dmitry, Kazahaya Ryunosuke, Fischer Tobias Gas Emissions From Volcanoes of the Kuril Island Arc (NW Pacific): Geochemistry and Fluxes // Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 2018. V. 19. V. 6. P. 1859-1880. doi: 10.1029/2018GC007477.    Annotation
The Kuril Island arc extending for about 1,200 km from Kamchatka Peninsula to Hokkaido Island is a typical active subduction zone with ∼40 historically active subaerial volcanoes, some of which are persistently degassing. Seven Kurilian volcanoes (Ebeko, Sinarka, Kuntomintar, Chirinkotan, Pallas, Berg, and Kudryavy) on six islands (Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Chirinkotan, Ketoy, Urup, and Iturup) emit into the atmosphere > 90% of the total fumarolic gas of the arc. During the field campaigns in 2015–2017 direct sampling of fumaroles, MultiGas measurements of the fumarolic plumes and DOAS remote determinations of the SO2 flux were conducted on these volcanoes. Maximal temperatures of the fumaroles in 2015–2016 were 510°C (Ebeko), 440°C (Sinarka), 260°C (Kuntomintar), 720°C (Pallas), and 820°C (Kudryavy). The total SO2 flux (in metric tons per day) from fumarolic fields of the studied volcanoes was measured as ∼1,800 ± 300 t/d, and the CO2 flux is estimated as 1,250 ± 400 t/d. Geochemical characteristics of the sampled gases include δD and δ18O of fumarolic condensates, δ13C of CO2, δ34S of the total sulfur, ratios 3He/4He and 40Ar/36Ar, concentrations of the major gas species, and trace elements in the volcanic gas condensates. The mole ratios C/S are generally <1. All volcanoes of the arc, except the southernmost Mendeleev and Golovnin volcanoes on Kunashir Island, emit gases with 3He/4He values of >7RA (where RA is the atmospheric 3He/4He). The highest 3He/4He ratios of 8.3RA were measured in fumaroles of the Pallas volcano (Ketoy Island) in the middle of the arc.
Горшков Г.С. Вулканизм Курильской островной дуги / Отв. ред. Рудич К.Н. 1967. 288 с.    Annotation
Работа состоит из двух частей. В первой из них приводятся подробные данные о всех голоценовых вулканах и большинстве плейстоценовых вулканических массивов. Для каждого вулкана приведены данные о форме, строении, петрографии и истории развития. Отдельная глава посвящена петрографическим и петрохимическим особенностям курильских лав. Все вулканологические данные увязаны с особенностями строения земной коры и верхней мантии.
В монографии впервые в мировой вулканологической литературе приводятся такие подробные данные по большому кругу вопросов, на столь обширной территории.
Во второй части рассматриваются петрохимические особенности, а также имеющиеся сведения о строении земной коры и верхней мантии в островных и вулканических дугах, внутри океанических и внутриконтиненталъных вулканах Тихоокеанской области. На большом новом материале подтверждаются выводы о мантийном питании вулканов и о существовании двух главных классов пород — океанического и континентального. Дается схема эволюции вулканизма, как отображение эволюции верхней
мантии.
Книга рассчитана на геологов широкого профиля, а также геофизиков и геохимиков.
Горшков Г.С. Действующие вулканы Курильской островной дуги // Молодой вулканизм СССР. Труды Лаборатории вулканологии АН СССР. 1958. № 13. С. 5-70.




 

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