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Records: 2577
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Remote sensing and petrological observations on the 2012–2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: Implications for reconstruction of the eruption chronology (2015)
Melnikov Dmitry, Volynets Anna O. Remote sensing and petrological observations on the 2012–2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: Implications for reconstruction of the eruption chronology // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 89 - 97. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.09.025.
   Annotation
Abstract We present a reconstruction of the chronological sequence of events that took place during the first days of the 2012–2013 Tolbachik fissure eruption using petrological data and remote sensing methods. We were forced to use this approach because bad weather conditions did not allow direct observations during the first two days of the eruption. We interpreted infrared images from the scanning radiometer {VIIRS} Suomi {NPP} and correlated the output with the results of the geochemical study, including comparison of the ash, deposited at the period from 27 to 29 November, with the samples of lava and bombs erupted from the Menyailov and Naboko vents. We argue that the compositional change observed in the eruption products (the decrease of SiO2 concentration and K2O/MgO ratio, increase of MgO concentration and Mg#) started approximately 24 h after the eruption began. At this time the center of activity moved to the southern part of the fissure, where the Naboko group of vents was formed; therefore, this timeframe also characterizes the timing of the Naboko vent opening. The Naboko group of vents remained active until the end of eruption in September 2013.
Report of the UNESCO volcanological mission to Indonesia in 1963 (1964)
Piip B.I., Tonani F., Suehiro C. Report of the UNESCO volcanological mission to Indonesia in 1963 / Bulletin UNESCO. Paris: Unesco. 1964.
Reprint of "Seismic monitoring of the Plosky Tolbachik eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka Peninsula Russia)" (2015)
Senyukov S.L., Nuzhdina I.N., Droznina S.Ya., Garbuzova V.T., Kozhevnikova T.Yu., Sobolevskaya O.V., Nazarova Z.A., Bliznetsov V.E. Reprint of "Seismic monitoring of the Plosky Tolbachik eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka Peninsula Russia)" // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. Vol. 307. P. 47 - 59. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.07.026.
   Annotation
Abstract The active basaltic volcano Plosky Tolbachik (Pl. Tolbachik) is located in the southern part of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group on the Kamchatka Peninsula. The previous 1975–1976 Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (1975–1976 GTFE) occurred in the southern sector of Pl. Tolbachik. It was preceded by powerful earthquakes with local magnitudes between 2.5 and 4.9 and it was successfully predicted with a short-term forecast. The Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Survey (KBGS) of the Russian Academy of Science (RAS) began to publish the results of daily seismic monitoring of active Kamchatka volcanoes on the Internet in 2000. Unlike the 1975–1976 {GTFE} precursor, (1) seismicity before the 2012–2013 Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (2012–2013 TFE) was relatively weak and earthquake magnitudes did not exceed 2.5. (2) Precursory earthquake hypocenters at 0–5 km depth were concentrated mainly under the southeastern part of the volcano. (3) The frequency of events gradually increased in September 2012, and rose sharply on the eve of the eruption. (4) According to seismic data, the explosive-effusive 2012–2013 {TFE} began at ~ 05 h 15 min {UTC} on November 27, 2012; the outbreak occurred between the summit of the Pl. Tolbachik and the Northern Breakthrough of the 1975–1976 GTFE. (5) Because of bad weather, early interpretations of the onset time and the character of the eruption were made using seismological data only and were confirmed later by other monitoring methods. The eruption finished in early September 2013. This article presents the data obtained through real-time seismic monitoring and the results of retrospective analysis, with additional comments on the future monitoring of volcanic activity.
Resolving discordant U–Th–Ra ages: constraints on petrogenetic processes of recent effusive eruptions at Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan (2015)
Zellmer Georg F., Rubin K., Miller C., Shellnut G., Belousov Alexander, Belousova Marina Resolving discordant U–Th–Ra ages: constraints on petrogenetic processes of recent effusive eruptions at Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan / Chemical, Physical and Temporal Evolution of Magmatic Systems. London: Geological Society, Special Publications. // The Geological Society of London. 2015. Vol. 422. doi: 10.1144/SP422.3.
Results of geochemical monitoring of the activity of Ebeko volcano (Kurile Islands) used for eruption prediction (1985)
Menyailov I.A., Nikitina L.P., Shapar V.N. Results of geochemical monitoring of the activity of Ebeko volcano (Kurile Islands) used for eruption prediction // Journal of Geodynamics. 1985. Vol. 3. № 3-4. P. 259 - 274. doi: 10.1016/0264-3707(85)90038-9.
   Annotation
The monitoring of the state of active volcanoes, carried out using different parameters, including geochemical, is very important for studies of deep processes and geodynamics. All changes which occur within the crater before eruptions reflect the magma activation and depend on the deep structure of volcano. This paper gives the results of prolonged monitoring of Ebeko volcano, located in the contact zone between the oceanic and continental plates (the Kurile Island Arc). The geochemical method has been used as the basis for eruption prediction because the increase in the activity of the Ebeko in the period from 1963 to 1967 that ended in a phreatic eruption was not preceded by seismic preparation. Investigations carried out at Ebeko volcano give evidence that change of all the chosen geochemical parameters is a prognostic indicator of a forthcoming eruption. This change depends on the type of eruption, and the deep structure and hydrodynamic regime of the volcano.
Rheological burst as mechanism of andesitic pyroclastics formation (1995)
Maximov A.P. Rheological burst as mechanism of andesitic pyroclastics formation // IUGG XXI Gener. Assemb.. 1995, Boulder, USA. 1995. P. B411
Rift zone reorganization through flank instability in ocean island volcanoes: an example from Tenerife, Canary Islands (2005)
Walter T. R., Troll V. R., Cailleau B., Belousov A., Schmincke H.-U., Amelung F., Bogaard P. Rift zone reorganization through flank instability in ocean island volcanoes: an example from Tenerife, Canary Islands // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2005. Vol. 67. № 4. P. 281-291. doi:10.1007/s00445-004-0352-z.
Rift- and arc-type basaltic volcanism of the Sredinny Ridge, Kamchatka: case study of the Payalpan volcano-tectonic structure (2004)
Ivanov A.V., Perepelov A.B., Puzankov M.Yu., Yasnygina T.A., Malykh Yu.M., Rasskazov S.V. Rift- and arc-type basaltic volcanism of the Sredinny Ridge, Kamchatka: case study of the Payalpan volcano-tectonic structure / Metallogeny of the Pacific Northwest: Tectonics, Magmatism and Metallogeny of Active Continental Margins. Vladavostok: Dalnauka. 2004. P. 345-349.
   Annotation
Trace element data for volcanic rocks of the Payalpan volcano-tectonic structure (Sredinny ridge, Kamchatka) allows distinguishing typical island-arc, rift and transitional series of rocks. Island-arc basaltic and differentiated magmas erupted in the Late Miocene and Pliocene. In the Late Pliocene – Early Pleistocene, there was a voluminous event dominated by the basaltic magmas of rift-type series. This event followed by voluminous eruptions of mainly basaltic andesites of transitional series. At the end of the Pleistocene and probably during the Holocene volume of eruptions diminished and composition of magmas shifted towards rift-type basaltic series. Practically in the same area in the Pleistocene and Holocene the Icha volcano produced basaltic andesite to rhyolite magmas of the island-arc and transitional series. Reasons for spatial overlapping and temporal evolution of the island-arc and rift magma types are also discussed.
Russian eruption warning systems for aviation (2011)
Neal C.A., Girina O.A., Senyukov S.L., Rybin A.V., Osiensky J., Izbekov P., Ferguson G. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation // Materials of ISTC International Workshop “Worldwide early warning system of volcanic activities and mitigation of the global/regional consequences of volcanic eruptions”, Moscow, Russia, July 8-9, 2010. Moscow: ISTC. 2011. P. 29-47.
Russian eruption warning systems for aviation (2009)
Neal C.A., Girina O.A., Senyukov S.L., Rybin A.V., Osiensky J., Izbekov P., Ferguson G. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation // Natural Hazards. 2009. Vol. 51. № 2. P. 245-262. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-009-9347-6.
   Annotation
More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded.