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 A
A guide to the volcanoes of southern Kamchatka, Russia (2001)
Waltham Tony A guide to the volcanoes of southern Kamchatka, Russia // Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 2001. V. 112. № 1. P. 67 - 78. doi: 10.1016/S0016-7878(01)80051-1.    Annotation
The remote sub-arctic wilderness of Kamchatka contains a line of active volcanoes above the Pacific Ocean plate subduction zone. This guide is based on the itinerary of the 1999 GA excursion to sites around Petropavlovsk. Descriptions cover the Uzon caldera and its Valley of Geysers, and the volcanoes of Avacha, Karimsky, Gorely and Mutnovsky.
A multi-sensor satellite assessment of SO2 emissions from the 2012–13 eruption of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka (2015)
Telling J., Flower V.J.B., Carn S.A. A multi-sensor satellite assessment of SO2 emissions from the 2012–13 eruption of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. V. 307. P. 98 - 106. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.07.010.    Annotation
Abstract Prolonged basaltic effusive eruptions at high latitudes can have significant atmospheric and environmental impacts, but can be challenging to observe in winter conditions. Here, we use multi-sensor satellite data to assess sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from the 2012–2013 eruption of Plosky Tolbachik volcano (Kamchatka), which lasted ~ 9–10 months and erupted ~ 0.55 km3 DRE. Observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are used to evaluate volcanic activity, SO2 emissions and heat flux associated with the effusion of lava flows. Gaps in the primary OMI SO2 time-series dataset occurred due to instrument limitations and adverse meteorological conditions. Four methods were tested to assess how efficiently they could fill these data gaps and improve estimates of total SO2 emissions. When available, using data from other {SO2} observing instruments was the most comprehensive way to address these data gaps. Satellite measurements yield a total SO2 loading of ~ 200 kt SO2 during the 10-month Plosky Tolbachik eruption, although actual SO2 emissions may have been greater. Based on the satellite SO2 measurements, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) multi-taper method (MTM) was used to analyze cyclical behavior in the complete data series and a 55-day cycle potentially attributable to the eruptive behavior of Plosky Tolbachik during the 2012 – 2013 eruption was identified.
A petrological and geochemical study on time-series samples from Klyuchevskoy volcano, Kamchatka arc (2017)
Bergal-Kuvikas Olga, Nakagawa Mitsuhiro, Kuritani Takeshi, Muravyev Yaroslav, Malik Nataliya, Klimenko Elena, Amma-Miyasaka Mizuho, Matsumoto Akiko, Shimada Shunjiro A petrological and geochemical study on time-series samples from Klyuchevskoy volcano, Kamchatka arc // Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. 2017. V. 172. № 5. doi:10.1007/s00410-017-1347-z.
A thermal anomaly as a precursor for predictions of strong explosive volcanic eruptions (2013)
Girina O.A. A thermal anomaly as a precursor for predictions of strong explosive volcanic eruptions // Abstracts. IAVCEI 2013 Scientific Assembly, July 20 - 24. Kagoshima, Japan: 2013. № 1357-1.
AIRBORNE ASH HAZARD MITIGATION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC: A MULTI-AGENCY, INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION (2004)
Neal C.A., Girina O.A., Ferguson G., Osiensky J. AIRBORNE ASH HAZARD MITIGATION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC: A MULTI-AGENCY, INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION // Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety, June 21-24, 2004, Session 2. Alexandria, Virginia (USA): 2004. P. 55
ASTER and field observations of the 24 December 2006 eruption of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia (2008)
Carter A.J., Girina O.A., Ramsey M.S., Demyanchuk Yu.V. ASTER and field observations of the 24 December 2006 eruption of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia // Remote Sensing of Environment. 2008. V. 112. P. 2569-2577.    Annotation
An explosive eruption occurred at Bezymianny Volcano (Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia) on 24 December 2006 at 09:17 (UTC). Seismicity
increased three weeks prior to the large eruption, which produced a 12–15 km above sea level (ASL) ash column. We present field observations from 27 December 2006 and 2 March 2007, combined with satellite data collected from 8 October 2006 to 11 April 2007 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), as part of the instrument's rapid-response program to volcanic eruptions. Pixel-integrated brightness temperatures were calculated from both ASTER 90 m/pixel thermal infrared (TIR) data as well as 30 m/pixel shortwave infrared (SWIR) data. Four days prior to the eruption, the maximum TIR temperature was 45 °C above the average background temperature (−33 °C) at the dome, which we interpret was a precursory signal, and had dropped to 8 °C above background by 18 March 2007. On 20 December 2006, there was also a clear thermal signal in the SWIR data of 128 °C using ASTER Band 7 (2.26 μm). The maximum SWIR temperature was 181 °C on the lava dome on 4 January 2007, decreasing below the detection limit of the SWIR data by 11 April 2007. On 4 January 2007 a hot linear feature was observed at the dome in the SWIR data, which produced a maximum temperature of 700 °C for the hot fraction of the pixel using the dual band technique. This suggests that magmatic temperatures were present at the dome at this time, consistent with the emplacement of a new lava lobe following the eruption. The eruption also produced a large, 6.5 km long by up to 425 m wide pyroclastic flow (PF) deposit that was channelled into a valley to the south–southeast. The PF deposit cooled over the following three months but remained elevated above the average background temperature. A second field investigation in March 2007 revealed a still-warm PF deposit that contained fumaroles. It was also observed that the upper dome morphology had changed in the past year, with a new lava lobe having in-filled the crater that formed following the 9 May 2006 eruption. These data provide further information on effusive and explosive activity at Bezymianny using quantitative remote sensing data and reinforced by field observations to assist in pre-eruption detection as well as post-eruption monitoring.
Abrupt transition from fractional crystallization to magma mixing at Gorely volcano (Kamchatka) after caldera collapse (2016)
Gavrilenko Maxim, Ozerov Alexey, Kyle Philip R., Carr Michael J., Nikulin Alex, Vidito Christopher, Danyushevsky Leonid Abrupt transition from fractional crystallization to magma mixing at Gorely volcano (Kamchatka) after caldera collapse // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2016. V. 78. № 7. doi:10.1007/s00445-016-1038-z.    Annotation
A series of large caldera-forming eruptions (361–38 ka) transformed Gorely volcano, southern Kamchatka Peninsula, from a shield-type system dominated by fractional crystallization processes to a composite volcanic center, exhibiting geochemical evidence of magma mixing. Old Gorely, an early shield volcano (700–361 ka), was followed by Young Gorely eruptions. Calc-alkaline high magnesium basalt to rhyolite lavas have been erupted from Gorely volcano since the Pleistocene. Fractional crystallization dominated evolution of the Old Gorely magmas, whereas magma mixing is more prominent in the Young Gorely eruptive products. The role of rechargeevacuation processes in Gorely magma evolution is negligible (a closed magmatic system); however, crustal rock assimilation plays a significant role for the evolved magmas. Most Gorely magmas differentiate in a shallow magmatic system at pressures up to 300 MPa, ∼3 wt% H2O, and oxygen fugacity of ∼QFM + 1.5 log units. Magma temperatures of 1123–1218 °C were measured using aluminum distribution between olivine and spinel in Old and Young Gorely basalts. The crystallization sequence of major minerals for Old Gorely was as follows: olivine and spinel (Ol + Sp) for mafic compositions (more than 5 wt% of MgO); clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at ∼5 wt% of MgO (Ol +Cpx + Plag) and magnetite at ∼3.5 wt% of MgO (Ol + Cpx + Plag +Mt). We show that the shallow magma chamber evolution of Old Gorely occurs under conditions of decompression and degassing. We find that the caldera-forming eruption(s) modified the magma plumbing geometry. This led to a change in the dominant magma evolution process from fractional crystallization to magma mixing. We further suggest that disruption of the magma chamber and accompanying change in differentiation process have the potential to transform a shield volcanic system to that of composite cone on a global scale.
Active volcanoes of Kamchatka and Northern Kurils in 2005 (2007)
Girina O.A., Manevich A.G., Malik N.A., Melnikov D.V., Ushakov S.V., Demyanchuk Yu.V., Kotenko L.V. Active volcanoes of Kamchatka and Northern Kurils in 2005 // Journal of Volcanology and Seismology. 2007. V. 1. № 4. P. 237-247. doi: 10.1134/S0742046307040021.    Annotation
In 2005, six major eruptions of four Kamchatka volcanoes (Bezymyannyi, Klyuchevskoy, Shiveluch, and Karymskii) occurred and the Avachinskii, Mutnovskii, and Gorelyi Kamchatka volcanoes and the Ebeko and Chikurachki volcanoes in northern Kurils were in a state of increased activity. Owing to a close collaboration between the KVERT project, Elizovo airport meteorological center, and volcanic ash advisory centers in Tokyo, Anchorage, and Washington (Tokyo, Anchorage, and Washington VAACs), all necessary measures for safe airplane flights near Kamchatka were taken and fatal accidents related to volcanic activity did not occur.
Active volcanoes on Kamchatka, Russia (2006)
Gordeev E.I., Girina O.A., Ushakov S.V., Senyukov S.L. Active volcanoes on Kamchatka, Russia // Abstracts for Fourth International Conference Cities on Volcanoes. IAVCEI. Quito-Ecuador. January 23-27. 2006. 2006. P. 22
Activity in the Karymsky Center in 1996: Summit Eruption at Karymsky and Phreatomagmatic Eruption in the Akademii Nauk Caldera (1998)
Muravyev Y.D., Fedotov S.A., Budnikov V.A., Ozerov A.Yu., Maguskin M.A., Dvigalo V.N., Andreev V.I., Ivanov V.V., Kartasheva L.A., Markov I.A. Activity in the Karymsky Center in 1996: Summit Eruption at Karymsky and Phreatomagmatic Eruption in the Akademii Nauk Caldera // Volcanology and Seismology. 1998. V. 19. № 5. P. 567-604.    Annotation
Data are presented from studies of volcanoes in the Karymsky long-living volcanic center, Kamchatka in 1996. We examine the dynamics and rock composition for eruptions that started simultaneously on Karymsky Volcano and in the Akademia Nauk caldera. The effusive-explosive eruption of Karymsky Volcano was resumed after a 14-year repose period, producing about 30 million tons of andesite-dacite discharges through the summit vent. Long-continued eruptive activity of that volcano is supposed to go on during the near future. Simultaneously with this activity, typical of Karymsky Volcano, a subaquaceous explosive eruption was observed in the lake that occupies the Akademia Nauk caldera 6 km south of the volcano for the first time in Kamchatka during the historical period. An edifice arose in the northern part of Lake Karymsky during 18 hours of this eruption consisting of basaltic and basaltic andesite pyroclastic material surrounding a crater of diameter 650 m. The amount of erupted pyroclastic material is estimated as 0.04 km3, the total weight being over 70 million tons. A discussion is provided of the impact of these eruptions on the environment; we describe renewed hydrothermal activity and the formation of a new group of hot springs in the Akademia Nauk caldera, and estimate the possibility of breakthrough floods from Lake Karymsky etc.

Представлены материалы исследований деятельности вулканов Карымского долгоживущего вулканического центра на Камчатке в 1996 г. Рассмотрены особенности динамики и вещественный состав пород одновременно начавшихся извержений вулкана Карымский и в кальдере Академии Наук. Эффузивно-эксплозивное извержение Карымского вулкана возобновилось после 14-летнего периода покоя и в течение года поставило через вершинный кратер -30 млн.т вещества андезитодацитового состава. Предполагается длительная эруптивная активность этого вулкана в ближайшие годы. Одновременно с типичной для Карымского вулкана активностью в 6 км южнее впервые на Камчатке в историческое время наблюдалось субаквальное эксплозивное извержение в озере, занимающем кальдеру Академии Наук. За 18ч извержения в северной части Карымского озера выросла постройка из пирокластического материала базальтового, андезитобазальтового состава с кратером диаметром 650 м. Объем извергнутого пирокластического материала оценивается в 0.04 км3, общий вес >70 млн.т. Обсуждены последствия извержений для окружающей среды, описаны оживление гидротермальной деятельности и образование новой группы горячих источников в кальдере Академии Наук, сделаны оценки прорывных паводков из Карымского озера и т.п.





 

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