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Records: 2276
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Detection of a new summit crater on Bezymianny Volcano lava dome: satellite and field-based thermal data (2007)
Carter Adam J., Ramsey Michael S., Belousov Alexander B. Detection of a new summit crater on Bezymianny Volcano lava dome: satellite and field-based thermal data // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2007. V. 69. № 7. P. 811-815. doi:10.1007/s00445-007-0113-x.
Determination of the explosion energy in some volcanoes according to barograms (1960)
Gorshkov G.S. Determination of the explosion energy in some volcanoes according to barograms // Bulletin Volcanologique. 1960. V. 23. № 2. P. 141-144.
Dike model for the 2012–2013 Tolbachik eruption constrained by satellite radar interferometry observations (2015)
Lundgren Paul, Kiryukhin Alexey, Milillo Pietro, Samsonov Sergey Dike model for the 2012–2013 Tolbachik eruption constrained by satellite radar interferometry observations // Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015. V. 307. P. 79 - 88. doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2015.05.011.    Annotation
Abstract A large dike intrusion and fissure eruption lasting 9 months began on November 27, 2013, beneath the south flank of Tolbachik Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. The eruption was the most recent at Tolbachik since the Great Tolbachik Eruption from 1975 to 1976. The 2012 eruption was preceded by more than 6 months of seismicity that clustered beneath the east flank of the volcano along a NW–SE trend. Seismicity increased dramatically before the eruption, with propagation of the seismicity from the central volcano conduit in the final hours. We use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to compute relative displacement images (interferograms) for {SAR} data pairs spanning the eruption. We use satellite {SAR} data from the Canadian Space Agency's RADARSAT-2 and from the Italian Space Agency's COSMO-SkyMed missions. Data are modeled first through a Markov Chain Monte Carlo solution for a single tensile dislocation (dike). We then use a boundary element method that includes topography to model a distributed dike-opening model. We find the best-fitting dike dips 80° to the {WNW} with maximum opening of 6–8 m, localized in the near surface and more broadly distributed in distinct regions up to 3 km beneath the surface, which varies from 1 to 2 km elevation for the eruptive fissures. The distribution of dike opening and its correspondence with co-diking seismicity suggests that the dike propagated radially from Tolbachik's central conduit.
Directed blasts and blast-generated pyroclastic density currents: a comparison of the Bezymianny 1956, Mount St Helens 1980, and Soufrière Hills, Montserrat 1997 eruptions and deposits (2007)
Belousov Alexander, Voight Barry, Belousova Marina Directed blasts and blast-generated pyroclastic density currents: a comparison of the Bezymianny 1956, Mount St Helens 1980, and Soufrière Hills, Montserrat 1997 eruptions and deposits // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2007. V. 69. № 7. P. 701-740. doi:10.1007/s00445-006-0109-y.
Directed volcanic blasts (1963)
Gorshkov G.S. Directed volcanic blasts // Bulletin Volcanologique. 1963. V. 26. P. 83-88.
Discriminations in Generation of pyroclastic deposit types from andesitic volcanoes of Kamchatka (in the Bezymianny volcano case) (1995)
Bogoyavlenskaya G.E., Girina O.A. Discriminations in Generation of pyroclastic deposit types from andesitic volcanoes of Kamchatka (in the Bezymianny volcano case) // IUGG. XXI General Assembly. Colorado. 1995. P. B 410
Distribution and eruptive mechanism of maars in the Kamchatka Peninsula (2006)
Belousov A. B. Distribution and eruptive mechanism of maars in the Kamchatka Peninsula // Doklady Earth Sciences. 2006. V. 406. № 1. P. 24-27. doi:10.1134/S1028334X06010077.
Dynamic of the lava flows during the Tolbachik Fissure eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka) inferred from the satellite and ground-based observations (2014)
Melnikov Dmitry, Harris Andrew, Volynets Anna, Belousov Alexander, Belousova Marina Dynamic of the lava flows during the Tolbachik Fissure eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka) inferred from the satellite and ground-based observations // EGU General Assembly 2014. 2014, Vienna, Austria. 2014.    Annotation
Fissure eruption on the slope of Plosky Tolbachik volcano continued from November 27th, 2012 until September
2013. It was named as The Institute of Volcanology and Seismology 50th Anniversary Fissure Tolbachik Eruption.
The eruption started from the 5 km-long fissure opening and continued with the intensive lava effusion from it.
During the first two days of eruption the length of the lava flows was 9 km, and lava covered the area of 14.4
km2 (Gordeev et al., 2013). Lava discharge rate at this period was about 400 m3/sec. Two eruptive centers were
formed on the fissure – upper (Menyailov vent) and lower (Naboko vent), and lava gushed from them to the height
up to 200-300 meters. On December 1st, the Menyailov vent activity ceased, and the eruption concentrated at the
Naboko vent. Cinder cone was formed here, and lava flows effused from the base of the cone. Lava erupted from
the Menyailov vent, is different from the Naboko vent lava by higher silica content (SiO2 55.35 wt.% vs. 52.5
wt.%, respectively). That may be caused by the discharge of two levels of the magma chamber, fractionated to
a different extent. Morphologically, lava flows from the beginning of eruption until April 2013 were dominantly
aa-lava type, and from April until September 2013 pahoehoe type dominated.
For distinguishing of the dynamic of the lava flows the following methods were applied. As remote sensing methods
we used different satellite data – for specification of the area covered by lava flows, their length, temperature we
used Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8, ASTER, EO-1 ALI and HYPERION. For time averaged discharge rate (TADR)
and lava flow area determination we used AVHRR data. We detected that in December 2013 lava discharge rate
varied from 120 to 40 m3/sec, and then it gradually decreased to average values 5-15 m3/sec and remained on this
level until the end of eruption. These data are confirmed by the ground-based observations, which were conducted
during the entire period of eruption. At the end of eruption in September 2013, lava flows area was about 36 km2, the maximum length of the lava flow – 15 km.
Dynamics and viscosity of 'a'a and pahoehoe lava flows of the 2012-13 eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia (2018)
Belousov A., Belousova M. Dynamics and viscosity of 'a'a and pahoehoe lava flows of the 2012-13 eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia // Bulletin of Volcanology. 2018. V. 80. № 6.
Dynamics of the 1800 14C yr BP caldera-forming Eruption of Ksudach Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia (2007)
Andrews B.J., Gardner J.E., Tait S., Ponomareva V.V., Melekestsev I.V. Dynamics of the 1800 14C yr BP caldera-forming Eruption of Ksudach Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia // Geophysical Monograph Series. // Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region. 2007. V. 172. P. 325-342. № doi:10.1029/172GM23.    Annotation
The 1800 14C yr BP Ksudach KS1 rhyodacite deposits present an opportunity to study the effects of caldera collapse on eruption dynamics and behavior. Stratigraphic relations indicate four Phases of eruption, Initial, Main, Lithic, and Gray. Well-sorted, reverse-graded pumice fall deposits overlying a silty ash compose the Initial Phase layers. The Main, Lithic, and Gray Phases are represented by pumice fall layers interbedded with pyroclastic flow and surge deposits (proximally) and co-ignimbrite ashes (distally). Although most of the deposit is <30 wt.% lithics, the Lithic Phase layers are >50 wt.% lithics. White and gray pumice are compositionally indistinguishable, however vesicle textures and microlite populations indicate faster ascent by the white pumice prior to eruption of the Gray Phase. The eruption volume is estimated as ∼8.5 km3 magma (dense rock equivalent) and ∼3.6 km3 lithics. Isopleth maps indicate mass flux ranged from 5–10×10^7 kg/s during the Initial Phase to >10^8 kg/s during the Main, Lithic, and Gray Phases. Caldera Collapse during the Lithic Phase is reflected by a large increase in lithic particles and the abrupt textural change from white to gray pumice; collapse began following eruption of ∼66% of the magma, and finished when ∼72% of the magma was erupted. Stratigraphic, granulometric, and component analyses indicate simultaneous eruption of buoyant plumes and non-buoyant flows during the Main, Lithic, and Gray Phases. Although mass flux did not change significantly following caldera collapse, the Gray Phase of eruption was dominated by non-buoyant flows in contrast to the earlier Phases that erupted mostly buoyant plumes.



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