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Records: 2522
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VONA/KVERT Information Releases (2005)
VONA/KVERT Information Releases. 2005.
Variations of Volcanic Glass Composition Show Possible Mixing Event at the Beginning of 1996 Eruption of Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia (1998)
Izbekov P., Eichelberger J., Ivanov B., Maximov A. Variations of Volcanic Glass Composition Show Possible Mixing Event at the Beginning of 1996 Eruption of Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia // Trans. American Geophys. Union, Fall Meet. Suppl, Abstract . 1998. Vol. 79(45). P. V22B-10.
Video observations inside conduits of erupting geysers in Kamchatka, Russia, and their geological framework: Implications for the geyser mechanism (2013)
Belousov A., Belousova M., Nechayev A. Video observations inside conduits of erupting geysers in Kamchatka, Russia, and their geological framework: Implications for the geyser mechanism // Geology. 2013. Vol. 41. № 4. P. 387-390. doi:10.1130/G33366.1.
VolSatView Information System Capabilities for Studying Kamchatka and Northern Kuriles Volcanic Activity (2016)
Gordeev E.I., Loupian E.A., Girina O.A., Sorokin A.A. VolSatView Information System Capabilities for Studying Kamchatka and Northern Kuriles Volcanic Activity // Modern Information Technologies in Earth Sciences. Proc. of the VI International Conference, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, August 7-11, 2016. Vladivostok: Dalnauka. 2016. P. 19
Volatile (S, Cl and F) and fluid mobile trace element compositions in melt inclusions: implications for variable fluid sources across the Kamchatka arc (2007)
Churikova Tatiana, Wörner Gerhard, Mironov Nikita, Kronz Andreas Volatile (S, Cl and F) and fluid mobile trace element compositions in melt inclusions: implications for variable fluid sources across the Kamchatka arc // Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. 2007. Vol. 154. № 2. P. 217-239. doi:10.1007/s00410-007-0190-z.    Annotation
Volatile element, major and trace element compositions were measured in glass inclusions in olivine from samples across the Kamchatka arc. Glasses were analyzed in reheated melt inclusions by electron microprobe for major elements, S and Cl, trace elements and F were determined by SIMS. Volatile element–trace element ratios correlated with fluid-mobile elements (B, Li) suggesting successive changes and three distinct fluid compositions with increasing slab depth. The Eastern Volcanic arc Front (EVF) was dominated by fluid highly enriched in B, Cl and chalcophile elements and also LILE (U, Th, Ba, Pb), F, S and LREE (La, Ce). This arc-front fluid contributed less to magmas from the central volcanic zone and was not involved in back arc magmatism. The Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) was dominated by a second fluid enriched in S and U, showing the highest S/K2O and U/Th ratios. Additionally this fluid was unusually enriched in 87Sr and 18O. In the back arc Sredinny Ridge (SR) a third fluid was observed, highly enriched in F, Li, and Be as well as LILE and LREE. We argue from the decoupling of B and Li that dehydration of different water-rich minerals at different depths explains the presence of different fluids across the Kamchatka arc. In the arc front, fluids were derived from amphibole and serpentine dehydration and probably were water-rich, low in silica and high in B, LILE, sulfur and chlorine. Large amounts of water produced high degrees of melting below the EVF and CKD. Fluids below the CKD were released at a depth between 100 and 200 km due to dehydration of lawsonite and phengite and probably were poorer in water and richer in silica. Fluids released at high pressure conditions below the back arc (SR) probably were much denser and dissolved significant amounts of silicate minerals, and potentially carried high amounts of LILE and HFSE.
Volcanic Ash Hazard along the North Pacific (NOPAC) Air Routs: Kurile Islands - Kamchatka - Alaska (1995)
Miller T.P., Kirianov V.Yu. Volcanic Ash Hazard along the North Pacific (NOPAC) Air Routs: Kurile Islands - Kamchatka - Alaska // Proc. of the 95 International workshop on Volcanoes Commemorating the 50-th Anniversary of the Mt. Shova-Shinzan: Short papers and Abstracts. 1995.
Volcanic Ash in Kamchatka as a Source of Potential Hazard to Air Traffic (1994)
Kirianov V.Yu. Volcanic Ash in Kamchatka as a Source of Potential Hazard to Air Traffic // Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety: Proc. First Intern. Symp. on Volcanic Ash and Aviation safety. US Geological Survey Bull. US Geological Survey. 1994. Vol. 2047. P. 57-63. https://doi.org/10.3133/b2047.
Volcanic Cloud Electrification (1988)
Rulenko O.P. Volcanic Cloud Electrification // Volcanology and Seismology. 1988. Vol. 7. № 2. P. 253-272.
Volcanic Explosions at Karymsky: A Broadband Experiment Around the cone (1997)
Lees J.M., Johnson J., Gordeev E.I., Batereau K., Ozerov A.Yu. Volcanic Explosions at Karymsky: A Broadband Experiment Around the cone // AGU Spring Meeting 1997 Abstracts. Baltimore, Maryland: AGU. 1997. P. S11C-06.
Volcanic Explosions. On the concept of "Volcanic Explosion" (1983)
Tokarev P.I. Volcanic Explosions. On the concept of "Volcanic Explosion" // Volcanology and Seismology. 1983. № 3. P. 315-322.